Peace Witness in a Time of Endless War


Third Quaker-led gathering/workshop for Putting and End to War (PEtW). We aim to draw forth skilled occupation of public places and embolden public imagination to further peace and disarmament. Together, we will affirm the elders of this peace work, draw strength from Quaker testimony, familiarise ourselves with contemporary peace activism, and skill up in the use of digital media to get our witness noticed.

The workshop program includes:

• take part in the Anzac eve Peace Vigil at the Australian War Memorial and in the Anzac Day Lest We Forget the Frontier Wars March.

• share stories and group process with experienced peace activists aimed at building support and mentoring relationships

• design, accomplish, record and post to social media a peace witness at the gates of nearby HQ JOC, the military operational command centre near Bungendore.

Previous Gatherings were held in 2010 and 2012 .

Peace Witness Brochure Download

The full cost of the course is $450. Register here.

Subsidies are available for those who can't afford the full cost but you must apply in advance. If you need a subsidy choose the option Peace Witness etc. Subsidy application. Your application form will be forwarded to Helen Bayes, the Organiser. Register here.

Registration is open

 
Helen Bayes learned Quaker peace testimony as a child of her Meeting – international development, nuclear disarmament, peace and race relations. In her work-life she sought ways to serve peace and justice in various settings: town planning, welfare services, income security, detention.  Retired from public service, she became a full-time advocate for the human rights of children, particularly concerned about child soldiers, adoption, sexual exploitation and physical punishment.  Since retirement, as one of the Quaker Grannies for Peace, she has focussed on acting against military bases and militarised occupation of Palestine and West Papua.

Helen Bayes learned Quaker peace testimony as a child of her Meeting – international development, nuclear disarmament, peace and race relations. In her work-life she sought ways to serve peace and justice in various settings: town planning, welfare services, income security, detention.  Retired from public service, she became a full-time advocate for the human rights of children, particularly concerned about child soldiers, adoption, sexual exploitation and physical punishment.  Since retirement, as one of the Quaker Grannies for Peace, she has focussed on acting against military bases and militarised occupation of Palestine and West Papua.